Lili Zhou

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Background: Near the turn of the century, Lili Zhou
worked as an interpreter at Hong Kong’ s British Consulate.
When an assistant to the consul raped and murdered her,
it caused a spot of tension between the British and
Chinese governments before they quietly swept the entire
matter under the rug and forgot about it.
Lili, however, would never forget. Her soul suffered
for months in Yomi until she escaped and took the Second
Breath. She then set about avenging herself. The Kuei-jin
followed the trail of murdered and half-eaten Britons and
quickly found her. It was another matter handled quietly
and soon forgotten — again, by everyone except Lili.

Image: Lili Zhou possesses the beauty — and cold
touch — of a finely crafted statue. It is a beauty that brought
about her death, and one she has honed into a weapon
since taking the Second Breath. She has long midnight hair
that usually falls in cascades around her expressionless face
with its fine porcelain skin. She wears her hair up when she
requires stealth or must act quickly. She is tall with a
statuesque figure; lean and agile. She prefers dressing in
tight black clothing for all but the most formal occasions,
and even then favors black robes with accents of white,
yellow and the pink of faded cherry blossoms.

Roleplaying Notes: Once you raged and screamed
until your throat was bare and your spirit spent. Now you
grow comfortable in your emptiness and cultivate the
Cold Mind, allowing you to calm your fury and see clearly.
You find it unfortunate that so many others lack your
clarity of thought and vision, but you understand it is your
duty to guide them toward righteous action. You see too
many followers of your own Dharma trapped in inaction
and indecision. The key is to still the mind so that action
is effortless, in harmony with the Way. That is why you
accomplish what you must, without fear or regret, and
why in the end you will succeed.

Lili Zhou

Death is only the Beginning fasteraubert